Tostones or Patacones (Fried Green Plantains)


I learned to make tostones at age 7 with my Aunt Karen. They are usually eaten as a light snack or as a side dish with Latino dishes in the Caribbean.  I have decided to share the recipe with my CaribVue readers. Tostones are excellent when served with any type of stewed meat or fish. The word tostones is derived from the Spanish verb tostar meaning “to toast” is the name of a popular Latin American appetizer also known as patacones. Tostones are the equivalent to French fries in Latin American culture and may be eaten salted with or without mojo (a garlic sauce) or salsa. They are very popular in Puerto Rico, Cuba, and the Dominican Republic. Enjoy!

 

Ingredients & Utensils:

2-3 Unripened Green Plantains (make sure that the plantains are green with a faint yellow color along the ridges)

Vegetable or Canola

Tostonera/Heavy Plate (to flatten the plantains)

Cutting Board

Salt

Mojo or Salsa ( as a garnish)

 

Directions:


1. Pre-heat oil in a skillet or cast iron heavy pan.

2. With a sharp knife, cut off both ends of the platain.

3. Gently  score down vertically along the ridges, start peeling aside by flicking the knife edge under the peel along the cut edge.

4. After peeling the plantain, cut it into 3/4 inch pieces.

5. Place the pieces in the medium/hot oil and  turn until they have become a slightly golden color on both sides.

6. Remove the pieces from the oil and drain on a paper towel. Let these pieces cool for about 5 minutes.

7. Using a tostonera or sturdy well oiled  ceramic or china plate, smash the pieces flat.

8. Return the flattened plantains to the hot oil for another 5 minutes until golden brown, then remove to a paper towel.

9. Sprinkle with salt to taste.

10. Serve with mojo or salsa.

Note: Serve immediately.

About CaribVue

CaribVue, a digital magazine, blog, and multimedia site that features the best in Caribbean entertainment, travel, lifestyle, and culture.

Posted on October 28, 2010, in CaribCook, Recipes and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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